Pandragon Dan

Pandragon Dan

Author/Reviewer/Blogger

Pandragon Reviews - Underneath the Draconian Sky

When an author submits a book for review to me, the one thing that I ask is that they let me know if there is any strong sexual content. By that, I don’t mean a standard sex scene, or even an erotic sex scene, that I can handle. However, what I take issue with is the more, shall we say, extreme type of sexual content – such as torture, rape, bestiality and, um… scat. And no I’m not talking about the music genre – google it at your own risk.

 

I really just don’t enjoy this, it’s not for me. When I first started getting into Anime and Manga, a friend of mine showed me some hentai stories and personally I found a lot of disgusting (let’s just say I’ll never look at an octopus the same way). For me, rape and torture should be put across as a despicable act to horrify the readers, not be put across as a sexual fetish.

 

So when I was reading Underneath the Draconian Sky, I was a little dubious about it if I was being honest. But I did promise a review – and the author, Dale M. Chatwin was a reasonable enough guy when we talked via email, so I gave it the benefit of the doubt. So today here is my review of Underneath the Draconian Sky, a Steampunk/Fantasy/Horror novel that delves into the depths of insanity and depravity. Those with a weak stomach may want to look away now!

 

 

About The Author

 

Dale M. Chatwin was born in Warwickshire in 1988 and grew up in a small town called Sedgley located in the Black Country.  He part wrote his first novel at the age of 14 titled Destiny and Death, a vague pastiche of The Body and Dreamcatcher by Stephen King with elements of his own folded into the mix. But writing has been a passion and lifelong dream of his since before then. At 19 he moved to Southsea in Hampshire to gain some independent experience in life, and as a result of his time on that island (many short stories and poems later) he produced his first complete novel at the age of 24: Underneath the Draconian Sky which is available in paperback and eBook on Lulu and Amazon. Now after realising his dream of becoming a published author, Dale M. Chatwin is on a mission to expand and perfect his craft as a writer.

 

The link to his author central page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Dale-M-Chatwin/e/B005Y4GT9S

 

 

 
 

Cover

 

For a novel that is so brutal in its content, this cover is surprisingly gentle. It almost leads the reader into a false sense of security – which I don’t know if it was intentional or not, but that’s an interesting technique if so.

 

 

Synopsis

 

When 1107 is hired by saloon proprietor Sylvester Claproot to exterminate a group of escaped residents from the Bachman Gardens Institute for the Criminally Insane, it all seems like a run of the mill extermination: capture, torture and kill. He soon finds himself plunged into a brutal world of sexual lust, unhindered violence and where the fringes of sanity are lost to the winds of time. At the heart of this dark tale is the story of one man's acceptance of his own demise and his journey into a chaotic world where he is forced to chase his death across a brutal dystopian landscape. It is a novel that will keep you reading until the Sun scars the horizon.

 

 

What I liked

 

1107, also known as The Guy is an interesting anti-hero – the kinda “shoot first, forget the questions” sort that Clint Eastwood made popular. He’s a brutal, no nonsense kind of mercenary that likes to get the job done however possible – and some of the stuff he does would make Jack Bauer cringe! Whilst I personally don’t enjoy these type of characters, the world he inhabits is a cruel and unforgiving one, so I could accept the brutal things that he did to an extent. That being said, he did show some signs of humanity every so often so he wasn’t completely a monster.

 

I also have to give particular praise to the world of Underneath a Draconian Sky. As previously mentioned, the world is a mix of Steampunk, Sci-fi and even Fantasy. Normally, if you mix in too many genres, it can sometimes make the world a little too over the top and unbelievable, a trap I myself have fallen into. But the elements mixed in here work well and create a nightmarish hell – with dusty deserts, rusted industrial areas, dirty streets and decedent, corrupted religious ideology. It is a place that has no place for kindness or meekness, ruled by alien creatures that are pretty much dictators. It builds a dark and creepy atmosphere that puts you at unease pretty much the entire novel.

 

The story is both straight forward, but also quite complex at the same time. We follow The Guy as he tries to track down the High Occultist, who is the “Big Bad” of the story. There is a lot of build up to this character prior to meeting him, which worked well. Along the way, we learn a little more about the history of the world and the characters. It was good that the book didn’t give too much away at once so that we only learned a bit at a time, this helped paint a gradual picture of the events and created an interesting story.

 

All in all the plot works and sets up a nightmare of a trip where the fragility of the human mind is explored in horrific detail. However, there were some issues I had with this that I will explain in the next section.

 

 

What I didn’t like

 

Now, I have no problems with stories being disturbing or having disturbing imagery – in fact I like it when a story leaves me in a disturbed state of mind. However, what I did find hard to take was the amount of strong sexual content involved. Practically every other chapter involved someone being raped, tortured or worse. As I’ve said in my intro, I am not a huge fan of stories that put across rape and torture as a sexual fetish. And whilst I’m not saying that Underneath a Draconian Sky is anything like that, I do felt there was too much of this.

 

The major problem I had was that a lot of it was unnecessary and just put in just for shock value. The plot had already set a disturbing element, but this extra content just seemed to detract from that in some way and make it feel more mean spirited then it needed to. Plus, most of it I found was out of context and didn’t really do anything to help the scene. A lot of it could have easily been cut out and it would have preserved the nightmarish themes and atmosphere. Not only this, but I think it could also put off a lot of potential readers. Which is a shame as there is a good story underneath, exploring the themes of insanity and the dark side of human nature – but it kinda gets lost in all the rape and torture. And that’s just the stuff I can tell you about!

 

As you probably guessed by now, this book is NOT suitable for young readers. Also, I don’t recommend reading this whilst you’re eating. I made that mistake when reading it at lunch and I couldn’t finish my sandwich!

 

 

PROS (Sky’s the limit):

  • Main character is pretty badass!
  • Disturbing atmosphere.
  • Mythos of the world nicely thought out.

 

CONS (Draconian tactics):

  • Overly sexual context undermines the otherwise good setting.
  • Relies too much on shock tactics.
  • Totally unsuitable for younger readers.

 

 

Summary

 

It’s a good story with some nightmarish themes and disturbing imagery – but the extreme sexual content and unnecessary torture undermines it somewhat and takes away from the tension. Not one I’d recommend to someone with a weak constitution, but if you like your stories dark and atmosphere tense then you’ll most find this one an interesting read.

 

FINAL SCORE: 3/5

 

 

 

-------------------------

PANDRAGON

 

Facebook:  LINK

Twitter:  LINK

Website:  LINK

Pandragon Reviews: Blue on the Horizon: Troll

Today I’m reviewing a very interesting piece on trolls. No, not the type that cause chaos on the internet, but rather the mythical creatures. Now trolls often get a lot of bad press in Fantasy stories, but this time they are the central characters, which is a refreshing change to say the least.

 

This one is heavily stepped in Norse mythology, but also adds a lot of social commentary. Which is an interesting concept that made me want to read it. So, why don’t we dive into the world of Fantasy and review Blue on the Horizon: Troll by Rebecca Ferrell Porter.

 

 

About The Author

 

I wasn’t provided any links from the author, so I got a link to her Goodreads page. Feel free to check it out if you wish to follow this author.

 

Goodreads

 

 

 

 

 

Cover

 

The cover certainly matches the title, and it is a nice cover. You can see the blue eyes with the aurora borealis, looking over the horizon – so it’s Blue on the Horizon! Get it? Ahem, anyway, I think it works well and certainly attracts attention.

 

 

Synopsis (from Goodreads)

 

They say that the eyes are the windows to the soul, but what if those eyes reflect your worst fears? Fairies have planted a changeling in the poor troll village of Torv. Gaven’s blue eyes blink out at a world where only fairies bare the pale eyes of the fey. She is declared an abomination, and as the fear oozes through Torv, Gaven is banished and bullied, left to linger in the marsh, where alone, she will not survive. Then, mere heartbeats from the snapping jaws of a fearsome predator, Gaven finds a friend: Azool, the most feared fairy in the valley. How could the trusting trollkin have understood the implications as she enters into an apprenticeship with the duplicitous blue fairy of Torv?

 

The treachery expands as Azool orders her swarm to invade the dragon lair where she forces the mysterious creatures into colorful saddles, and uses the murderous lizards to incinerate the wealthy village of Breen. Azool and her swarm assume everyone is dead, but as Uredd stumbles from the only home he has ever known, his mother’s words echo in his head, ‘he is the one’.

 

With both ends of the valley in turmoil, the fairies start to squeeze the middle, but Azool’s changeling has grown stronger. Still, it will take everything Gaven has to survive the events that follow, but with help from her squabbling friends, she might avoid a fate worse than death.

 

 

What I liked

 

The first thing I liked was the role reversal of the trolls and fairies. Normally, fairies are considered the good guys and the trolls the bad guys. But here, it was the mirror opposite – in fact the fairies are actually really nasty to the poor trolls, wanting to destroy them all, burn their village and even use poor Gaven as part of their plans. It kinda felt like a social commentary, the fairies representing the “master race”, wanting to wipe out the inferior species.

 

In fact, Blue has quite a few social commentaries. Gaven is an outcast because of her blue eyes and is often bullied for it. It brings up a lot of ideas of bullying and the fear of those that are different – something that I’m sure everyone can relate to. It’s a good message and it works well in this context. Thankfully, Gaven does work hard to find acceptance from her people and in the end is able to use her fairy powers to her advantage. Overall the book has a very good moral – and being a Young Adult story that’s important to have.

 

Uredd is the only troll that accepts Gaven for what she is and I have to say the paring worked well together. I have to say, I didn’t really like him as much as Gaven as he didn’t really do a whole lot – but he was there for Gaven where it mattered so I’ll give him the benefit of the doubt. The dragon (Stump I think his name was) was also a great character – he’s one of the funniest and wittiest characters in the books. Think Yoda, but more sarcastic!

 

Each chapter is a POV of the main characters and this is something that I really like, hearing the characters thoughts and seeing things from their own POV. Each chapter is actually pretty short as well (usually about 3-4 pages or so, at least on my kindle) and you can breeze through it in a few moments. I actually read through about twenty chapters in one sitting without realising it. It makes this book really easy and very quick to read.

 

 

What I didn’t like

 

This is where I kinda will contradict my earlier statement. Despite what I said about the short chapters and it being quick to read, not a lot really happens in the book. I’m not saying that there isn’t any storyline, because there is, but most of the time it just focused on Gaven and Uredd’s relationship and trying to settle in and setting up a new home after their first one was destroyed by Azool. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with that, but I just felt that some stuff that could have been cut out to get to the action a lot faster.

 

Also, if I’m being honest, I found the final battle with Azool a bit of a cop out. I can’t really say why as it would spoil the ending (and I like to keep spoilers down to a minimum in my reviews as much as possible) but I think the last fight could have been a little more epic, considering all the build up it had. But that’s probably just me nitpicking – I guess once you’ve seen The Battle of the Blackwater or Helm’s Deep, you expect every Fantasy battle to be huge. XD

 

 

PROS (I’m a troll man):

  • Interesting role reversal of the trolls and fairies.
  • Strong moral message.
  • Short chapters makes the story quick to read.
  • Accessible to all ages.

 

CONS (Trollololo):

  • Balance of action and story could have been better for me.
  • Ending a bit of a cop out.

 

 

Summary

 

A nice Fantasy story with a strong moral, based around the theme of acceptance – all set around a magical world of trolls and fairies. If you like stories with a strong message then I recommend you check this one out. It’s suitable for all ages so anyone should enjoy this tale.

 

FINAL SCORE: 4/5

 

 

 

-------------------------

PANDRAGON

 

Facebook:  LINK

Twitter:  LINK

Website:  LINK

Pandragon Reviews: Blue on the Horizon: Troll

Today I’m reviewing a very interesting piece on trolls. No, not the type that cause chaos on the internet, but rather the mythical creatures. Now trolls often get a lot of bad press in Fantasy stories, but this time they are the central characters, which is a refreshing change to say the least.

 

This one is heavily stepped in Norse mythology, but also adds a lot of social commentary. Which is an interesting concept that made me want to read it. So, why don’t we dive into the world of Fantasy and review Blue on the Horizon: Troll by Rebecca Ferrell Porter.

 

 

About The Author

 

I wasn’t provided any links from the author, so I got a link to her Goodreads page. Feel free to check it out if you wish to follow this author.

 

Goodreads

 

 

 

 

 

Cover

 

The cover certainly matches the title, and it is a nice cover. You can see the blue eyes with the aurora borealis, looking over the horizon – so it’s Blue on the Horizon! Get it? Ahem, anyway, I think it works well and certainly attracts attention.

 

 

Synopsis (from Goodreads)

 

They say that the eyes are the windows to the soul, but what if those eyes reflect your worst fears? Fairies have planted a changeling in the poor troll village of Torv. Gaven’s blue eyes blink out at a world where only fairies bare the pale eyes of the fey. She is declared an abomination, and as the fear oozes through Torv, Gaven is banished and bullied, left to linger in the marsh, where alone, she will not survive. Then, mere heartbeats from the snapping jaws of a fearsome predator, Gaven finds a friend: Azool, the most feared fairy in the valley. How could the trusting trollkin have understood the implications as she enters into an apprenticeship with the duplicitous blue fairy of Torv?

 

The treachery expands as Azool orders her swarm to invade the dragon lair where she forces the mysterious creatures into colorful saddles, and uses the murderous lizards to incinerate the wealthy village of Breen. Azool and her swarm assume everyone is dead, but as Uredd stumbles from the only home he has ever known, his mother’s words echo in his head, ‘he is the one’.

 

With both ends of the valley in turmoil, the fairies start to squeeze the middle, but Azool’s changeling has grown stronger. Still, it will take everything Gaven has to survive the events that follow, but with help from her squabbling friends, she might avoid a fate worse than death.

 

 

What I liked

 

The first thing I liked was the role reversal of the trolls and fairies. Normally, fairies are considered the good guys and the trolls the bad guys. But here, it was the mirror opposite – in fact the fairies are actually really nasty to the poor trolls, wanting to destroy them all, burn their village and even use poor Gaven as part of their plans. It kinda felt like a social commentary, the fairies representing the “master race”, wanting to wipe out the inferior species.

 

In fact, Blue has quite a few social commentaries. Gaven is an outcast because of her blue eyes and is often bullied for it. It brings up a lot of ideas of bullying and the fear of those that are different – something that I’m sure everyone can relate to. It’s a good message and it works well in this context. Thankfully, Gaven does work hard to find acceptance from her people and in the end is able to use her fairy powers to her advantage. Overall the book has a very good moral – and being a Young Adult story that’s important to have.

 

Uredd is the only troll that accepts Gaven for what she is and I have to say the paring worked well together. I have to say, I didn’t really like him as much as Gaven as he didn’t really do a whole lot – but he was there for Gaven where it mattered so I’ll give him the benefit of the doubt. The dragon (Stump I think his name was) was also a great character – he’s one of the funniest and wittiest characters in the books. Think Yoda, but more sarcastic!

 

Each chapter is a POV of the main characters and this is something that I really like, hearing the characters thoughts and seeing things from their own POV. Each chapter is actually pretty short as well (usually about 3-4 pages or so, at least on my kindle) and you can breeze through it in a few moments. I actually read through about twenty chapters in one sitting without realising it. It makes this book really easy and very quick to read.

 

 

What I didn’t like

 

This is where I kinda will contradict my earlier statement. Despite what I said about the short chapters and it being quick to read, not a lot really happens in the book. I’m not saying that there isn’t any storyline, because there is, but most of the time it just focused on Gaven and Uredd’s relationship and trying to settle in and setting up a new home after their first one was destroyed by Azool. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with that, but I just felt that some stuff that could have been cut out to get to the action a lot faster.

 

Also, if I’m being honest, I found the final battle with Azool a bit of a cop out. I can’t really say why as it would spoil the ending (and I like to keep spoilers down to a minimum in my reviews as much as possible) but I think the last fight could have been a little more epic, considering all the build up it had. But that’s probably just me nitpicking – I guess once you’ve seen The Battle of the Blackwater or Helm’s Deep, you expect every Fantasy battle to be huge. XD

 

 

PROS (I’m a troll man):

  • Interesting role reversal of the trolls and fairies.
  • Strong moral message.
  • Short chapters makes the story quick to read.
  • Accessible to all ages.

 

CONS (Trollololo):

  • Balance of action and story could have been better for me.
  • Ending a bit of a cop out.

 

 

Summary

 

A nice Fantasy story with a strong moral, based around the theme of acceptance – all set around a magical world of trolls and fairies. If you like stories with a strong message then I recommend you check this one out. It’s suitable for all ages so anyone should enjoy this tale.

 

FINAL SCORE: 4/5

 

 

 

-------------------------

PANDRAGON

 

Facebook:  LINK

Twitter:  LINK

Website:  LINK

Disarming Depth Charging Ice Planet Goth - A Guest Post By Andrez Bergen

Today I'm fortunate enough to have one of my favourite authors on my blog - Andrez Bergen.

 

I've been a huge fan of this guys work ever since I read Tobacco Stained Mountain Goat and 100 Years of Vicissitude - two of the most original Sci-Fi and Fantasy stories I've read. Both were a joy to read and review, in fact the latter I'm sure would be perfect as a Hayao Miyazaki film! His writing style is just so engaging and unique, mixing in Aussie humour with numerous references to Japanese culture - and even some video game references. He's an amazing author and it's a crime that he isn't getting more attention.

 

So when I heard that he had a new novel coming out Depth Charging Ice Planet Goth (best title ever!) I practically begged him to come on my blog. And lo and behold, he said yes! :D

 

Today I thought I'd let him talk a little bit about his forthcoming novel and a little about how the protagonist is very personal to him. Take it away Andrez1

 

 

 

 

DISARMING ‘DEPTH CHARGING ICE PLANET GOTH’

 

Truth to tell? There’s a lot of me in Mina Rapace.

 

There always is a fair share of myself in all the characters I’ve created, particularly central ones like Floyd Maquina in Tobacco-Stained Mountain Goat, Jack/Jacob in Who is Killing the Great Capes of Heropa?, even the elderly, grouchy Wolram E. Deaps in One Hundred Years of Vicissitude.

 

While other people I know colour supporting characters, the protagonists like to plumb depths beneath my façade. This isn’t something I set out to do, but critics always go on about the subjectivity of writers and I think – in many situations – they’re often correct in this assumption. Who better to mine for personality quirks than ourselves?

 

In Mina’s case, aside from the fact we’re of opposite sex, we both went to single-sex public schools aspiring to be private ones (Melbourne High School for me, for Mina the fictional Mac.Duagh – based on Melbourne High’s sister school Mac.Rob). Like Mina I was a painfully shy teenager who existed on the outer of social circles, hid behind a fringe, and later went through a goth/post-punk phase via which I could truly ‘discover’ myself or at least dust the insecurities under a mental doormat. I adored the music Mina does in this novel, and I suffered from a physically abusive older brother who had a penchant for covering my face with saliva any given chance. As with Mina, my only recourse for revenge was to covertly spit upon this sibling’s toothbrush.

 

But Mina suffers even more than I did, and she’s a far stronger person by the end of the book. If I possess fifty percent of the personal strength Mina does by our story’s closure, I’d be happy with my lot in life – which I actually am, by the way. Lastly, I don’t have and never possessed an imaginary friend of the ‘Harvey/Animeid’ variety, and I didn’t have to play Sherlock in any kind of murder mystery or deal with conniving mates. Mad ones I actually like.

 

Mina is also a would-be writer, and the short stories and vignettes she creates are pieces I’ve actually done independently, cannibalized to sit pretty with particular situations.

 

For me as writer, Mina is a fascinating character, one I’m going to be mysterious here and say I’ve touched upon before – but cannot reveal how and why since this would inject spoilers. She’s a personality I’ve also explored and honed via another medium – comic books – and I’m sure people will see more of her beyond Depth Charging Ice Planet Goth.

 

I think she deserves the attention, but I’m biased.

 

Lastly, the novel is dedicated in its opening pages to “the nobodies of the world”, people like Mina and myself who try to give the challenge of life a go in spite of repressive circumstances. That’s a theme I’m keen to push, as much as anything else. Life can be a brilliant bauble once you’re able to glance past the crap to embrace the thing and hang onto its merry coattails.

 

 

ANDREZ BERGEN

 

 

Thanks for a very inspiring post, Andrez. I'll have an interview with him on this blog very soon. Until then, you can check out his author page at:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Andrez-Bergen/e/B009I1QB2I

 

 

Thanks for reading guys. Have a grea weekend.

 

 

 

--------------------------

PANDRAGON

 

Facebook:  LINK

Twitter:  LINK

Website:  LINK

Interview with Alexis M Centeno

Guys, I got a real treat for you today. Recently, I reconnected with Alexis M Centeno, the original artist for the Draconica series. Many of you who follow my work will know the huge contribution that she has made to her series - her art setting the standard for all other Draconica art that followed. She is an amazingly talented artist and, whilst she no longer works on the Draconica series, it was great for her to reconnect.

 

So, as a special treat, she agreed to do an interview on my blog - and we can even show you the mini comic that she drew for me as well! So sit back and relax and let's catch up with one of the most talent artists I have ever worked with.

 

 

 

 

Tell us a bit about yourself – how did you first get into art?

 

I’ve been drawing my whole life. It’s just something I have to do.

 

 

Who would you say are your influences?

 

That is really hard to pinpoint these days:). For the last few years, I’ve been a sponge soaking up whatever catches my eye. I don’t even put too much thought anymore; if I like something; whatever it is, I’ll put it into a design; the more outside the box the better.

 

 

What are your major artistic tools you are using at the moment?

 

3D has really expanded my toolbox. I would say I use ZBrush and MAYA as much as Photoshop these days. For the sake of staying competitive, I have to use a lot of different 3D apps and plugins, but ZBrush is a great tool even for 2D illustrators.

 

 

How did we (you and Dan) first meet?

 

It’s been a long time, but I think it all started with me answering an ad on a comic book forum. Dan was (and still is) very easy to work with and it just took off from there.

 

 

What was it like working on the Draconica series?

 

Draconica was probably one of the most important artistic experiences of my life. I learned a lot about how to work with a writer. Luckily, Dan was very open with his story and characters; he never stifled my creativity and was always very encouraging. It was a fun experience and I’m very glad I answered that ad.

 

 

What have you been doing since Draconica?

 

Working on Draconica gave me the confidence to pursue other areas of art, so I took time to finish my BFA in computer animation and work on characters in 3D. Right now it looks like I’m coming full circle by doing pre-viz work for an animated short tentatively called Grandpa that I would like to complete by Halloween 2014. Stay tuned to my blog, http://dispersersden.tumblr.com/  for updates.

 

 

Do you still follow the Draconica series in any way or have you moved onto bigger things?

 

I drew the characters for several years and it is hard not to become a little possessive. It was better for me to put some distance. However, the story continues and I am happy to see it succeed. Draconica and its characters will always be special to me. Based on the people’s appetite for good fantasy, it’s only a matter of time until Dan’s books reach a much wider audience.

 

 

Do you have any favourite characters in the Draconica series?

 

There are so many wonderful characters to choose from, but Mordak and Zarracka remain my favourites.

 

 

And who are your least or most hated characters?

 

I was never a fan of Daniar. Maybe because Zarracka was my favourite princess and I saw Daniar through her eyes.

 

 

What do you think about the forthcoming book Final Ragnarok: She Returns? Are you excited about it? What do you think is going to happen – and what are you most looking forward to?

 

I recently saw the trailer and it seems very exciting. During the making of Legacy of the Dragonkin, Dan had mentioned a few shocking plot points he was considering for the future. Should be interesting what made it in and what didn’t. I’m also excited about Dan’s other projects outside this series; he’s been very busy.

 

 

Now, let’s talk a little bit about the commission you’re doing for me – a mini comic called The Bad Girls of Draconica

 

 

 

 

What’s happening in this picture? Who are these characters and what is about to happen?

 

One of the most interesting aspects of working with Dan were the “what if” illustrations. He would write up a scenario and I would illustrate it. I never knew if it would go into the story of if he was testing things out to see if it would work.  Here is a “what if” Zarracka and Kthonia teamed up to take down Mordak and Lucia. Here the two ladies are agreeing to use their wind powers to get rid of them. They’re both powerful and confident, so I wanted to show their playful side.

 

 

 

 

Looks like some serious stuff is going down here! Can you tell us what’s happening?

 

Here Mordak is going in for the kill, but the ladies combine their power to literally blow him to pieces.

 

 

 

 

And finally, what’s happening to the poor guy here?

 

Blowing up Lucia seemed a bit much, so here he gets a tap from the cyclone and that is enough to send him hurtling to space like old school team rocket.

 

 

Moral of the story: don't f*** with the ladies of Draconica! XD So what’s next for you?

 

My post-grad experience has been very technical. I spent a lot of time learning software, and that’s great, but working on this commission for Dan reminded me how much I love to draw and I haven’t stopped since. I do hope I can recruit enough artists to make an animated short happen; I think it will be very special and allow me to do both the 2D and 3D art I enjoy so much. I also hope it will put another spotlight on Miami based 3D artists. There is so much talent here, but it often goes unrecognized.

 

 

Finally, one more question before you go. If you had the option to spend one day with one of the characters from the Draconica series, who would it be and why?

 

Based on how I answered the questions above, Zarracka would be the obvious choice. She knows how to have fun :)

 

 

Be sure to follow Alexis at http://dispersersden.com/ to check out more of her upcoming projects and more excellent art! Thanks to Alexis for being here today!

 

 

 

--------------------------

PANDRAGON

 

Facebook:  LINK

Twitter:  LINK

Website:  LINK

Blog Stats

  • Total posts(293)
  • Total comments(318)

Forgot your password?